The Gilbert Slomowitz Foundation

About Gilbert Slomowitz

Gilbert Slomowitz knew he had found exactly what he was looking for after reading a newspaper article that his wife Adele had brought to his attention.  The Washington Post published a report on August 23,1971 discussing the various health benefits of Transcendental Meditation.  A few days later, Gilbert and his 15 year-old son Rich went to an introductory lecture and soon learned the technique.

Washington Post TM article (August 23, 1971) that inspired Gil Slomowitz to begin the practice of Transcendental Meditation
Washington Post (08/23/1971) Page 1

Click the image to view in larger format

Washington Post TM article (August 23, 1971) that inspired Gil Slomowitz to begin the practice of Transcendental Meditation
Washington Post (08/23/1971) Page 2

Click the image to view in larger format

A tax law specialist with the Internal Revenue Service by day, Gilbert Slomowitz was also an entrepreneur and futurist, a man with good ideas both in business and in lifestyle that would soon prove to be ahead of their time.  The only problem was that Gilbert also knew he did not have a very long future ahead of him.  Doctors told him that he had only ten years remaining to live at best.  Their examination revealed for the first time significant heart damage from rheumatic fever in childhood.  

 

Dealing with this reality, he explored ways to improve his health such as yoga, organic gardening and a food-as-medicine diet long before these practices had come into mainstream acceptance.  But the impact meditation had on Gilbert was by far the most dramatic.  The deterioration in his health slowed.  His attitude towards life brightened.

 

Without a doubt, TM played a key role in the fact that he lived  beyond what medical science had predicted. After a month of practicing TM, Adele noticed the positive changes in both her husband and her son and decided to become a meditator herself. 

 

Twelve-year-old daughter Nancy was another matter.  She was more independent and rebellious in spirit and preferred to watch television when the rest of the family meditated (her favorite show was I Dream of Jeannie).  When her father told her that some day she might do things just like the genie if she, too, learned how to meditate, Nancy was intrigued.  She did not want to let on that his comment had made such an impression, but several months later, she asked her father to take her to the TM center. 

 

In many ways, Gilbert Slomowitz's prophecy to his daughter about meditation came true. Through her daily practice, Nancy was able to deal with some serious emotional turmoil during her teenage years. She was able to channel her emotions into a creative energy that would give her a considerable advantage out in the world.  She also took her father's sage business advice to heart and displayed an acumen that achieved top results in almost every endeavor she pursued. 

 

Today, Nancy Slomowitz is the founder and CEO of Executive Management Associates, Inc. (EMA), a top-level business operations consulting firm to public and private sector institutions and corporations.  Nancy founded the Gilbert Slomowitz Foundation in order to continue her father's vision to actively help others unlock their boundless potential through the practice of meditation.